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Clout: The Art and Science of Influential Web Content (Voices That Matter)

Posted on December 02, 2012 by Blog Design Journal

Results. Everyone wants them, whether to sell more products, spread good ideas, or win more funding. In our busy digital world, the way to results is influencing people on the web. But how?

An ad campaign won’t cut it. A Twitter account doesn’t guarantee it. Manipulative tricks will backfire. Instead, you need quality, compelling web content that attracts people and engages them for the long haul.
 
Clout explains the key principles of influence and how to apply them to web content. Along the way, those principles come to life with practical examples from HowStuffWorks.com, Newell Rubbermaid, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and many more brands. With this book, you’ll:

  • Discover why a technology feature, marketing campaign, SEO effort, or redesign aren’t enough to influence online.
  • Understand the business value of compelling web content. 
  • Learn 8 principles for influence from the art of rhetoric and the science of psychology.
  • Find out what context is and why it’s so important to influence.
  • Jump start your planning for content with a content brief.
  • Learn how to evaluate your web content and determine whether it’s making a difference.

Foreword by Karen McGrane, managing partner of Bond Art + Science

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2 to “Clout: The Art and Science of Influential Web Content (Voices That Matter)”

  1. Andrew Maier says:

    An awesome, succinct summary of a nascent topic First, I’d like to say that I normally don’t write book reviews. Being a student of the web, I read *a lot* of material and I typically don’t have time to write a reaction. But every once and a while, something strikes me as noteworthy. Clout is just such a book.Having run an industry publication on User Experience Design for quite some time, I’m of course familiar with the discipline of Content Strategy. Unfortunately, though, running it means that most of what I read online or hear at conferences sounds the same. “Yes, I know I have to prioritize things and think strategically about content, thanks.” What I like about Clout is how novel it really is. In short, Clout:(1) Got my attention: its a new angle on what could easily be seen as a tired subject.(2) Is very “practice” driven: I don’t like reading about theory, I want to see how content strategy functions in the real world.(3) Is for beginners and experts: Clout starts small–a bit of history–and ends with a bang, a call to action for all web professionals.The author, Colleen, did a great job gathering insightful case studies and overseeing the creation of illustrative diagrams. Reading about content strategy is one thing, but *seeing* it is quite another, and Clout delivers. I find it quite remarkable that such an unassuming volume delivers such a high quantity of information. Here you’ll also find some of the major takeaways from books such as Groundswell and Here Comes Everybody.So, save yourself some reading and grab a copy of Clout. For the budding content strategist, blogger, entrepreneur, etc., I highly recommend it.

  2. Craig M. Oliver "craigmoliver" says:

    Web Developers who care about content should read this book As a web developer, I don’t get very close to the content. In fact, over the years, I’ve become blind to it when coding clients’ websites. It might as well be “lorum ipsum” gibberish like that found on Microsoft Word templates. Granted without this content there would be no websites for me to work on. Well…at least there shouldn’t be. There are many sites out there that put the technical effort into the coding and treat the content as an afterthought. Content should in fact come first, before coding. This requires developing a proper content strategy and a plan to implement it.In Clout, the author Colleen Jones concisely outlines the methods and techniques that will aid the development of a successful Content Strategy. There are numerous real-world examples that support the core principles of context, rhetoric and psychology. She advises content creators to turn off their fire hose of information, suggesting effective, proven tools to reach people. These techniques are proven to filter out the static.This book is a top resource regarding the implementation of content strategy. Clients who are inexperienced or non-technical usually don’t understand why developers can’t make the gibberish better. Content just isn’t our forte. Clout is a well-researched and authoritative source for developers who want to help their clients make content work.



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