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EVGA GeForce GTX 660 SUPERCLOCKED 2048MB GDDR5 DVI HDMI DP Graphics Card 02G-P4-2662-KR

Posted on May 24, 2013 by Blog Design Journal

Get the weapon of choice for gamers – the EVGA GeForce GTX 660. It takes NVIDIA Kepler-powered graphics cards to new levels of affordability while retaining class-leading performance and power efficiency, making it a must-have upgrade for today’s hottest games. The EVGA GeForce GTX 660 graphics card represents the Kepler “sweet spot” for gamers – the ultimate combination of performance, power efficiency, and affordability.

Product Features

  • Base Clock: 1046 MHz
  • Boost Clock: 1111
  • Memory Clock: 6008 MHz
  • CUDA Cores: 960
  • PCI-Express 3.0

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3 to “EVGA GeForce GTX 660 SUPERCLOCKED 2048MB GDDR5 DVI HDMI DP Graphics Card 02G-P4-2662-KR”

  1. Tommy M. says:

    Pocket rocket It’s 9.5 inches inches long, but it seems to sometimes give a 7950 a run for its money, which costs about $100 more for the good ones, and whose reference card clocks in at 11.5 inches. Battlefield 3 runs butter-smooth at 1080p, even with maxed settings. ENB shader mods and texture packs in Skyrim don’t slow it down (though a high amount of mod-enhanced foliage will cause even this card to strain at times). Metro 2033 runs fine at high settings.It takes pretty much everything I can throw at it — and it does it pretty much silently. The full “shroud” over the card ensures some noise absorption *and* reduced ambient heat inside the case. When you add adaptive Vsync, PhysX and CUDA into the mix, there’s a lot to like. You can also force FXAA in the control panel when you encounter a game that won’t accept your usual anti-aliasing settings and/or does not have any of its own.It has a 192-bit memory bus, which is unusually small. But this doesn’t seem to make much difference at 1080p. It’s not very overclockable, but when I can get nearly 7950 performance out-of-the-box at $230, and it needs just one PCIe cable (mounted on the side for better case ergonomics), I can’t really complain.The Gallium 0.4 drivers in Fedora 17 and Linux Mint produce a slightly fuzzy image, though. I had to install Nvidia’s proprietary drivers — not the easiest process — to get a crisp image. Not big enough of a deal to take a star off, IMO.If you’re playing games or otherwise rendering 3D at screen resolutions above 1080p, I’d recommend AMD’s 7950 or 7970, since they have more RAM and enough memory bandwidth to take advantage of it. But for gaming at 1080p, this card is hard to beat. You may want to hold out for Black Friday before getting it. But since it’s only been out for about a month, I would not expect significant discounts.**Update Jan 27:** Everything’s still working fine. I have updated the drivers several times without glitches. The card continues to run quietly and powerfully. Installing proprietary drivers in Linux is still pretty much necessary to get proper image fidelity (or even full desktop resolution, in most cases), but the process is noticeably easier just a few months after writing my original review. The Mageia 3 beta is the only Linux distro I’ve found that will not at least give me a command prompt, if it fails to load the desktop environment. On the Windows side, the recently released “GeForce Experience” software should make performance optimization much easier for people who are new to PC gaming, or if they have busy lives and not enough time to keep up on all the gearhead stuff. That piece of software does an all-or-nothing toggle, though, so it’s not ideal.I have yet to encounter any game that struggles at 1080p, but I figure it’s better to have the performance and not need it, than to need it and not have it. Plus, the upcoming consoles will presumably raise the bar anyway. If the rumors are accurate, they’ll be using the 7970 mobile GPU from AMD to drive their graphics, and it’s no slouch.

  2. Trevor says:

    Fantastic. This card is amazing. It plays any game I throw at it on the highest settings. I bought a $400 Gateway at the local store, tossed this and a new power supply in and now it’s a dream machine. The games I’ve been able to play on max settings at 1920×1080 include:Crysis: 55fpsCrysis 2: 70fpsWoW: 100fps+Skyrim: 60fpsDishonored: 90fpsMinecraft: 300fps+If you buy this card and you’re currently using integrated graphics, you will not regret it. It runs idle at around 33C, and in intense games it runs around 70C. The customer support is fantastic, and it comes with a 3 year warranty. You can’t go wrong with this card!PC Specs to show how low end my other parts are:Intel i3 2120 Dual core @ 3.3GHz8gb ram stockCorsair 650W PSUAcer stock motherboard

  3. Zalzan says:

    Powerful, easy to install As an MMO player, my GeForce 310 was just not cutting the mustard for me anymore (10-15 FPS on Guild Wars 2). I did the research, decided on the GTX 660 as the best combination of power and value for me, and ordered it. Also ordered a new power supply, as the minimum for this card is 450W. Got them, put them in. As an only moderately tech-savvy type, it took me about 30 minutes to replace both pieces. Not a big job. Put it all back together, and it worked! Now, getting 50-70 FPS rate on Guild Wars 2 with everything else the same, and can run on the higher graphics level instead of the most basic graphics level. Huge difference, well worth the money, and easy to put in. Comes with a couple of cool but probably unnecessary utilities too, if you are the type who likes to know the GPU temperature and GPU fan speed all the time.



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